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Category Archives: Neighborhoods

TBT – Cecil Street (Again?)

Okay – I seem to have a fascination with Cecil Street, which is now considered Kings Drive.  Back in the day however, Cecil Street used to end at the pasture for Thompson Orphanage and then take up on the other side of the property near Central High School. This picture, taken in the early 1950’s on the street at the edge of the Cherry Community features my dear hubby, his dad and two of his siblings Greg and Beverly Perry.  Unfortunately, three of them have passed on, but I still have the hubby!

Albert Perry, Leroy Perry, Gregory Perry and Beverly Perry at the end of Cecil Street in the early 1950's.  Photo from the author's collection.

Albert Perry, Leroy Perry, Gregory Perry and Beverly Perry at the end of Cecil Street in the early 1950’s. Photo from the author’s collection.

Here is what that spot looks like today:

Cecil Street at Kings Drive 2015.  Image courtesy of Google Earth.

Cecil Street at Kings Drive 2015. Image courtesy of Google Earth.

I wish that my late father in law could have seen the changes in his hometown.  Oh well, I think he is looking down and smiling. I hope that everyone has a safe holiday weekend!

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Posted by on April 2, 2015 in History, Neighborhoods, People

 

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Shuffletown Dragway

If you go up Bellhaven Boulevard going towards the Coulwood Neighborhood you may notice Shuffletown Park on the right within eyesight of I-485.  If you go past the baseball fields and dog park you will notice some pavement that may resemble a street.  This is the remains of the old Shuffletown Dragstrip, which was closed in 1996 after residents complained about the noise from races held there.

According to the Charlotte Observer, the raceway was opened in 1958 when the area was more rural.  As progress and growth growth followed, so did those who wanted their peace and quiet and was not fond of listening to the drag races in their backyard.  While googling the dragway, I found this YouTube Video that was uploaded on September 11, 2008 by diamondpvideo (which can be found at https:///www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNpOG8Hl4II) – this is a good look into amature drag racing in a period before the ZMax Dragway was built near the Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Today, the park takes up a lot of the old track property but there are remnants left if you look carefully:

Remains of the old pavement.  Picture taken by the author.

Remains of the old pavement. Picture taken by the author.

Remains of the electric poles used at the Shuffletown Dragway.  Picture taken by author.

Remains of the electric poles used at the Shuffletown Dragway. Picture taken by author.

I’m so glad that the land is not being forgotten, but is being used for good.  While a part of Mecklenburg County’s rural past has been erased in the name of progress, at least you can still see some if you look carefully.

I accessed the Charlotte Observer via their website: Sportsplex Delays Might Not Affect Opening Date by Karen Sullivan, Charlotte Observer September 8, 2008 accessed March 21, 2015.

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2015 in History, Neighborhoods, Places

 

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TBT – The H. D. Dennis Apartments

While I was looking around for a subject for today’s TBT entry, I ran across this photo on the cmstory.org website:

H. D. Dennis Apartments under construction 1928.  Photo courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library.

H. D. Dennis Apartments under construction 1928. Photo courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library.

Located at the corner of Granville Avenue and Hopewell Avenue in Myers Park it was built in 1928. the same year that Myers Park Traditional School (then known as Myers Park Public School) located about 1/2 mile to the south opened.  Well, that was then, this is now:

H. D. Dennis Apartments 2015.  Photo taken by the author.

H. D. Dennis Apartments 2015. Photo taken by the author.

Now that spring is on the way (finally!)  check out Charlotte’s historic neighborhoods, you might see something new!

 
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Posted by on March 20, 2015 in Buildings, Neighborhoods

 

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Throwback Thursday

I thought I would do a Throwback Thursday article.  This is a popular thing to do on Facebook, and yes I have commented on a picture or thrown a picture or two in myself.  Today I am showing a place in an old photograph and what it looks like today.  All older photographs are from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Library or the Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission and the newer photos have been taken by me.

Today, let us look at the intersection of 4th Street and Queens Road, which is the entrance to Myers Park.  Back when this photo was taken, the tree cover had not been planted yet:

Entrance to Myers Park (1912).  Picture courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Entrance to Myers Park (1912). Picture courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

According to the library, the trolley entrance was designed by John Nolen and built by the Stephens Company of Winnsboro, South Carolina.  Here what it looks like today:

Queens @ 4th II_2015

Queens at 4th Street 2015. Picture taken by the author.

While the trolley entrance is long gone, the two shelters are still there.  Please look for another entry next Thursday when I show you a location from the past and what it looks like now.

 
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Posted by on February 26, 2015 in History, Neighborhoods

 

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Belgrave Pavement

No I am not kidding, I was looking for anything that may give me a clue as to the location of Wream Field, home of the Charlotte Hornets from 1908-1948 before the owners built Crockett Park (another lost treasure, which I will explore in another article)  when I found this on a 1935 Charlotte City Map:

Belgrave Pavement_1935_

Okay, most of us are familiar with street naming, like Avenue, Street, Boulevard, and even some alleys from the early days of Charlotte but this one threw me for a loop.  Located in Dilworth, which is one of Charlotte’s earliest suburbs, similar to Myers Park was a planned neighborhood with wide winding streets with names such as Berkley, Romany and Buchanan centered around Latta Park, named for Edward Dilworth Latta, Founder and President of the 4C’s Company (Charlotte Consolidated Construction Company) and designed by the Olmsted brothers, one of the first architects and city planners who also designed Central Park in New York City.

Now known as Belgrave Place, it runs between Berkley Avenue and Romany Road ending at Latta Park.  Like many streets in Dilworth it is a tree lined peaceful street with speed humps and large houses of which many were built around the turn of the last century with some modern built homes which for the most of them they were designed to fit into the neighborhood.

Belgrave Place_Google Earth

Belgrave Place. Image courtesy of Google Earth 2015

If you want to learn more about the Dilworth Neighborhood, Edward Latta or about how our neighborhoods got started, please check out:

Sorting out the New South City by Dan Morrill (1998 University of North Carolina Press).  This can be ordered at Park Road Books located in the Park Road Shopping Center.  Written by the Historian at the Levine Museum of the New South located on North College Street, this was actually his doctoral dissertation and is a well written and through look at how Charlotte’s neighborhoods were shaped not only by geography, but politics and history.

 

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2015 in History, Neighborhoods, Places, Streets

 

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