RSS

Tag Archives: history

Lakewood Park

It is Sunday afternoon, you went to church that morning and you and your family are looking for something to do.  If it is between 1910 and 1933, your thoughts would turn to maybe taking a streetcar to Lakewood Park where you and your family could ride the boats on the lake,visit the other attractions or listen to a band in the pavilion located next to the lake.

Built in 1910 after the Southern Electric Company (one of the predecessor companies to today’s Duke Energy) to  built a dam and lake to cool electric turbines in nearby Chadwick Mill it soon became a recreational destination for those living in Charlotte and the surrounding area.  Of course due to the Jim Crow laws on the books at the time, Blacks were not permitted to visit the park and ads of the period made sure that Whites were the only ones who could visit the park:

Lakewood Park Ad for May 29 1915.  Photo courtesy of the Lakewood Park website.

Lakewood Park Ad for May 29 1915. Photo courtesy of the Lakewood Park website.

During the First World Way when Camp Greene was in full swing, soldiers were encouraged to visit the park, as the streetcar line ran right next to the camp; during this period Liberty Park was built for those soldiers but did not have all of the attractions that Lakewood had (like a lake!)

Unfortunately the park was closed in 1933 due to the Great Depression when people could no longer afford to visit.  The lake was drained in April 1936 when the dam holding the water in broke.  Another amusement park on this scale would not be seen in Charlotte until Carowinds opened up in 1973.  If you want to learn more about Lakewood Park, and of course where I got my information from, please check out:

http://www.lakewoodparkcharlotte.com/.  This site gives the history of the park with photographs and postcards of the era.

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Story at http://www.cmstry.org this site, sponsored by the Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library is a great resource for local history with images, copies of documents and links to other history sites.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 1, 2015 in History

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Easter Monday

Easter Eggs.  Image courtesy of Google Images.

Easter Eggs. Image courtesy of Google Images.

Up until 1987, the Monday after Easter was a state holiday that gave people a chance to do the things that they didn’t do on Easter Sunday such as attending baseball games, holding Easter Egg hunts or just enjoying a day off from work.  According to NCPedia it was proposed so that members of the General Assembly could attend the annual baseball game between NC State and Wake Forest University, which at that time was located in the town of Wake Forest in northern Wake County, but of course no paper records exist of the reasoning behind bringing this about.

A search of the 1935 General Assembly session minutes shows that this bill, which was S.B. 483 which included not only declaring the Monday after Easter as a state holiday, but also declares Decoration Day (which later became Memorial Day) a legal holiday to be celebrated on the 30th of May.

If you want to check out some more interesting facts about our state and our city, please check out NCPedia at:  ncpedia.org

Where did I get my information today?

“Easter Monday Holiday” Williford, Jo Ann 2006, NCPedia The University of North Carolina Press.  http://ncpedia.org/easter-monday-holiday.  Accessed April 5, 2015

“Chapter 212 – An Act to Amend Section Three Thousand Nine Hundred and Fifty Nine of the Consolidated Statutes so as to make Easter Monday and Decoration Day Legal Holidays” NC General Assembly 1935 Session.  Chapter 212, page 227.  Accessed via NCPedia on April 5, 2015.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 6, 2015 in History

 

Tags: , ,

Saturday Night at the Movies (who cares what picture you see?)

(The writer of this blog wishes to apologize to Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, the original writers of the song for borrowing this song line for this blog entry – full credit will be below)

Saturday nights in Charlotte before WBTV went on the air in 1949 meant that you had a couple of choices to take your significant other.  You could take them to a swanky restaurant in the Barranger, Selwyn or Charlotte Hotels, or if you belong to the Charlotte City Club or the local country clubs you could go there.  If you couldn’t afford to do that or you didn’t belong to those clubs, you could take her to the movies.

For a town the size of Charlotte, we had plenty of theatres to choose from.  In the Uptown area we had the Carolina Theatre on North Tryon Street near 6th:

Facade of the Carolina Theatre 1927.  Photo courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

Facade of the Carolina Theatre 1927. Photo courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

There was the Imperial Theatre on the South Side of the Square located on South Tryon Street and the Charlotte Theatre located on West Trade Street.  If you lived out in the neighborhoods of Dilworth, Myers Park and Midtown, you had your choices of the Dilworth located on South Boulevard, the Center on East Morehead Street and the Charlottetown Mall Theatre located across the street from Midtown Mall.

But because this was also the age of Jim Crow, they had to build separate theatres for African Americans.  In the Brooklyn neighborhood of Second Ward, they had the Savoy and the Lincoln and the Grand on Beatties Ford Road near Johnson C. Smith University.

The Savoy Theatre in the Brooklyn neighborhood,  date unknown.  Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Property Commission via Google Images.

The Savoy Theatre in the Brooklyn neighborhood, date unknown. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Properties Commission via Google Images.

While making sure I got my facts straight for this blog entry, I found this website, which talks about movie theatres that are open, closed or demolished and has them sorted by state. You can find Cinema Treasures at http://cinematreasures.org.  Now, for the song that I used as my title for this blog entry:

The Drifters “Saturday Night at the Movies”  by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, written in 1964, released as a single by Atlantic Records.

The images that I used were obtained from:

The Carolina Theatre – from the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Image Collection. The photo of the Savoy Theatre is from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Properties Commission via Google Images.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 19, 2015 in History, Places

 

Tags: , , , ,